The intellectual life sertillanges download

 
    Contents
  1. A. D. Sertillanges - The Intellectual Life
  2. A.D.Sertillanges-The-Intellectual-Life.pdf
  3. The Intellectual Life by A.G. Sertillanges – The Prodigal Catholic Blog
  4. The Intellectual Life

to the intellectual life."-The Sign il 14 +2 ਦਾ ੧੫ - ੧ - 44 le. The. Intellectual. Its Spirit, Conditions, Methods. A. D. Sertillanges, O. P. translated by Mary Ryan. BOOK┠DOWNLOAD "The Intellectual Life by Antonin Sertillanges" phone reader français format flibusta authors ebay apple. The intellectual life: its spirit, conditions, methods by A. G. Sertillanges; 1 edition; First published in ; Subjects: Accessible book, Protected DAISY.

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The Intellectual Life Sertillanges Download

audiobook | *ebooks | Download PDF | ePub | DOC. This book was intellectual life part i my summary the agora | ag sertillanges the intellectual life part i | the. Summary of A. G. Sertillanges, The Intellectual Life Charles Bumgardner A. G. Sertillanges.1 The Intellectual Life: Its Spirit, Conditions, Methods. Washington. The Intellectual Life: Its Spirit, Conditions, Methods [OP A. G. Sertillanges, Mary Ryan, Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

He told me this topic was covered in Sertillanges' book and suggested I read it. The title makes it sound as if the book might be pretentious, but it is not. In the same way that Peter Drucker's superb The Effective Executive is a book for any knowledge worker rather than just for managers, Sertillanges' book should be helpful for anyone who wishes to work using their intellect, rather than just for rarefied intellectuals. The reissue the date listed on Amazon. I think he captures the essence of Sertillanges' book very well: "At first sight…this is a quaint book.

A. D. Sertillanges - The Intellectual Life

He goes on to say, The mind is dulled, not fed, by inordinate reading, it is made gradually incapable of reflection and concentration, and therefore of production; it grows inwardly extroverted, if one can so express oneself, becomes the slave of its mental images, of the ebb and flow of ideas on which it has eagerly fastened its attention. This uncontrolled delight is an escape from self; it ousts the intelligence from its function and allows it merely to follow point for point the thoughts of others, to be carried along in the stream of words, developments, chapters, volumes.

He then distinguishes four types of reading in the following section. They are fundamental, accidental, stimulating or edifying, and recreative reading This subsection of the book has three more sections about how to interact with authors and finally on a life of reading.

In my experience, what he says about inordinate reading has proven true. I think two insights follow, one for book reviewing, the other for seminary.

It can very easily be something that takes a big chunk of your time when you could be doing other worthwhile things.

A.D.Sertillanges-The-Intellectual-Life.pdf

Reading widely and deeply is beneficial. Reading excessively is not necessarily so. Even more so if my plans for reading interfere with productivity elsewhere. If you look back at the four categories Sertillanges gives, reading for the sole purpose of a book review is somewhere between stimulating and recreative. The same can happen with personal reading simply because we enjoy the subject matter.

The Intellectual Life by A.G. Sertillanges – The Prodigal Catholic Blog

The title makes it sound as if the book might be pretentious, but it is not. In the same way that Peter Drucker's superb The Effective Executive is a book for any knowledge worker rather than just for managers, Sertillanges' book should be helpful for anyone who wishes to work using their intellect, rather than just for rarefied intellectuals. The reissue the date listed on Amazon. I think he captures the essence of Sertillanges' book very well: "At first sight…this is a quaint book.

At second sight it is an utterly demanding book.

For Sertillanges, intellectual work is not something done in isolation of the rest of a person's life. He believes strongly that in order to do intellectual work to one's capacity, one must order the whole of one's life with this goal in mind.

The Intellectual Life

And further, that this requires habits of simplicity, detachment, note taking, memory, writing and more. His book is thus a step-by-step manual that sets out these requirements from the general virtues, character to the specific note-taking, writing. For most people who are not already members of religious orders Sertillanges was a Dominican friar it would be terrifically demanding to follow all of Sertillanges' prescriptions — and involve major changes to one's life.

Sertillanges does believe, however, that if one takes care with the rest of one's life then intellectual work can be done satisfactorily using only a couple of hours a day. His book is thus a mixture of the extremely demanding and eminently practical — particularly as much of his advice involves cutting out and eliminating habits that waste time and disturb thought e.

After reading Ben Franklin's autobiography and Charlie Munger's Poor Charlie's Almanack at the beginning of the year, I have become increasingly aware of the crucial role of habits in determining the outcome of peoples' lives. I was stupid enough to have spent a good proportion of my life testing out the truth of Franklin 's maxim: "Experience keeps a dear school, yet Fools will learn in no other.

After all, reliability — which Munger considers the single most important determining characteristic for a person's life — is really just another habit. Sertillanges understood this very well and the importance of habits that facilitate intellectual work is a topic that he brings up repeatedly — and in my view very wisely — in his book: "One acquires facility in thinking just as one acquires facility in playing the piano, in riding, or painting….